The spirits just understand our language

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Rede CineFlecha presents:

The spirits just understand our language

General Audience 2019 6 min

pt-br

It is not possible to download the file of this film. The screening can only happen in places with an internet connection. Organize your screening by clicking here.

Watch the trailer
Only six elders of the Manoki population in the Brazilian Amazon still speak their indigenous language, an imminent risk of losing the means by which they communicate with their spirits. Although this is a difficult topic, young people decide to tell in images and words their version of this long history of relations with non-indigenous people, talking about their pains, challenges, and desires. Despite all the difficulties of the current context, struggle and hope echo in various dimensions of the short film, indicating that “the Manoki language will survive!”

Directed by

Cileuza Jemjusi, Robert Tamuxi, Valdeilson Jolasi

Produced by

Coletivo Ijã Mytyli de CInema Manoki e Myky

Coproduction

André Tupxi Lopes

Sponsorship

--

Official Support

--

Category

Documentary

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Complete sheet

The spirits just understand our language (2019)

Age rating: General Audience

It is not possible to download the file of this film. The screening can only happen in places with an internet connection. Organize your screening by clicking here.

Directed by Cileuza Jemjusi Robert Tamuxi Valdeilson Jolasi

Produced by Coletivo Ijã Mytyli de CInema Manoki e Myky

Coproduction André Tupxi Lopes

Sponsorship --

Official Support --

Category Documentary

Theme (title) Human Rights Education Culture

ODSs --

Audio and Subtitles

Audio Portuguese BR

Standard --

Close Caption --

Audio Description --

Sign Language --

Synopsis

Only six elders of the Manoki population in the Brazilian Amazon still speak their indigenous language, an imminent risk of losing the means by which they communicate with their spirits. Although this is a difficult topic, young people decide to tell in images and words their version of this long history of relations with non-indigenous people, talking about their pains, challenges, and desires. Despite all the difficulties of the current context, struggle and hope echo in various dimensions of the short film, indicating that “the Manoki language will survive!”